Sado Kagetsu

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Nowadays Japanese tea ceremony may not be as popular as it used to be before, and in smaller towns some teachers may struggle to find enough students. They may also teach their students individually, unlike in the past when for a tea ceremony practice – keiko (稽古), the teacher would gather all the students at […]

Hatsugama

Sado Hatsugama

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A formal tea ceremony, called chaji, can take up to four hours (plus additional preparation time before and after the event). It includes many different elements such as the appreciation of the art (the hanging scroll – kakejiku and flower composition- chabana), charcoal laying rituals (shozumi and gozumi), two kinds of tea (thick tea – […]

Stories from a tearoom window

Shigenori Chikamatsu ‘Stories from a Tearoom Window’ – Tea Book Review

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Tea ceremony with its long-lasting history nowadays is often romanticized with many wishing they could travel in time to experience it when it was developing a few centuries ago. ‘Stories from a tea room window’ written by Shigenoti Chikamatsu and first published in1804 gives a secret look of what tea ceremony was like back in […]

Takayama Chasen

Takayama Chasen

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Tea Culture, Teaware

Japanese tea ceremony is known throughout the world. The ceremonial preparation of tea includes some very traditional utensils, one of which is a bamboo whisk called chasen. It is made from one piece of bamboo, that is split and carved into a number of fine tines. It is little known that around 90% of chasen […]

Making tea, making Japan

K. Surak ‘Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice’ – Tea Book Review

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Chado – a uniquely Japanese tea ritual with both aesthetic and spiritual qualities, has attracted lots of attention all around the world with a number of books reviewing its philosophy, history and practice. ‘Making Tea, Making Japan’ by Kristin Surak, a university lecturer with vast experience in chado, presents chado as a tool of nation […]